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Posted by New Age Real Estate on 1/12/2018

You know there are certain household items that need to be replaced regularly. But just how regularly is where things might start to get fuzzy. Especially those big tickets items that need to be replaced on a yearly span rather than months or days. Keep reading to discover how often you need to replace items around the home. Pillows. You want to replace the pillows in your home every couple of years. Youíve probably heard by now that up to a third of a regularly used pillowís weight can be attributed to dust and dead skin cells. You may not, however, made the connection that a dust filled pillow equals dust mites. While dust mites do not carry communicable diseases, they do pose as an allergy and/or asthma irritant. HVAC filters. During the summer and winter months when your system is working longer hours to maintain your homeís temperatures you will want to change your filters each month. Meanwhile, in the spring and fall, you can do so less frequently, changing it around the three-month mark. Changing your filter regularly will keep your system running efficiently and save you money on energy costs in the long run. Fire extinguisher. You have a fire extinguisher in your home, right? If you donít I suggest you run out and get one right away. Fire extinguishers can be replaced every ten years, however, they do need to be tested monthly and inspected regularly. Toilet brush. This is one not many homeowners think of, if ever. However, it advisable to replace your toilet brush every six months with regular cleanings in between. As you can image, toilet brushes are host to all kinds of germs and bacteria you donít want to hang around your home. Toothbrushes. If your family stays on top of their recommended regular teeth cleanings every three months this point shouldnít be an issue. However, it is one worth mentioning. Your familyís toothbrushes should be replaced every three months as they can develop bacteria that lead to gingivitis and/or tooth decay. And isnít that what weíre trying to avoid when we brush our teeth? Smoke detectors.†It is best practice to proactively replace the batteries in your smoke detector†twice†a year. With that said it is a good idea to also replace the smoke detector itself every ten years to ensure you have an up to date model. Throughout those ten years, however, you should be regularly testing your alarms. If you have recently moved to a new home and are unsure of how old your smoke alarm system is it is a good idea to plan on replacing them in the near future. Hopefully, you already regularly maintain these items. However, if you canít remember the last time you have replaced any of the items mentioned you should consider making a plan to invest in some replacements. Making a spreadsheet in your home binder or setting up alerts on your virtual calendar will help you stay on top of the regular maintenance your household items require.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by New Age Real Estate on 10/6/2017

Being a homeowner can be a bit overwhelming at times. It can easily become difficult to juggle your homeowner responsibilities with your family and work obligations while still taking time for yourself to relax. It's a problem made even more difficult when you don't plan ahead for things like home maintenance.†Aside from keeping your home in good condition, some maintenance issues are also safety issues, making them all the more important to find time to tend to. So how can you make time to complete maintenance tasks and ensure you don't forget about them? In this article, we'll help you make a maintenance calendar that will help you hold yourself accountable to keep your home safe and in good condition.  

What should be on your calendar?

Each home is unique and will require different types of maintenance. But in general, most homes share characteristics that can be applied to your situation. We'll break up maintenance into two categories: safety and upkeep. Safety For the well-being of you and your family, be sure to add these items to your list:
  • Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors checked (monthly)
  • Smoke and carbon monoxide batteries changed (every 6 months)
  • Fire extinguisher checked (every 12 months)
  • Test door and window locks (every 12 months)
Upkeep Many items in your home will stop working properly if you don't practice good maintenance. Some of the most important items to practice maintenance on are:
  • Inspect your HVAC filters (every 3 months)
  • Clean the drains of your sinks and shower (every month)
  • Test seldom used objects like spare bathroom sinks and toilets (every 2 months)
  • Clean refrigerator coils and vent (every 6 months)
  • Replace water filters in refrigerator, sink, etc. (every 6 months)
  • Clean your gutters and drainage system (every 12 months)
  • Repair ripped window and door screens (every 12 months)

Seasonal maintenance

If you live in an area that has significant climate changes throughout the seasons, then there are an whole host of maintenance tasks required to prepare for the change of weather. Some common tasks include:
  • Turning off outdoor water to avoid frozen pipes
  • Replacing door screens with glass
  • Cleaning, installing, and uninstalling air conditioners
  • Sealing or repaving walkways and driveways
  • Cleaning chimneys
  • Dusting†off heaters
  • Inspecting your roof shingles

Creating your calendar

Now that you know what to put in your calendar, its time to decide how you're going to make it. If you carry your smartphone with you everywhere and check it constantly, it might be a good idea to use a good calendar app, preferably one that syncs with your other calendars (work, Facebook, etc.). Google Calendar allows you to categorize calendar events by colors, sync between accounts, and invite others to events (such as when you need your family's help with something on your list). If you're not big on technology, you could always keep a calendar attached to your refrigerator or in a frequented spot in the house that you and your family will remember to check often. Whichever method you choose, the important thing is to find one that works for you so that you don't forget these important items to keep your house, home, and family safe.    




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by New Age Real Estate on 11/25/2016

Most properly installed roofs have a useful life of greater than 20 years. Tile, slate, tin and copper roofs can last for decades longer before requiring replacement. The actual useful service of a roof is dependent on climate, snow load, material quality, design, proper installation and adequate roof maintenance.

When purchasing a new home, always include a complete roof inspection; making your offer contingent on the condition of the roof. A roof replacement is a big investment. Inquire about the age of the roof; ask if it is still under warranty and if the warranty is transferable to a new owner. A licensed home inspector can evaluate the roof or you may contact a professional roofing contractor for a certified inspection.

To safeguard against an unexpected financial expenditure, make sure that your homeowner's insurance coverage provides for the replacement cost of your roof in the event of a major storm, fire, food or devastating event. Read the small print when buying a homeowner's policy. Some plans only offer reimbursement of the depreciated value of the roof. In the case of an older roof, the coverage can be virtually nil.

A leaking roof does not always mean the roof of your home needs replacement. Leaks can occur from leaking flashings or damage to shingles. A complete roof system failure is rare and is the result of faulty installation techniques, the improper choice of materials or a type of roof system installation that was inappropriate for the design of the home.

If you are concerned that you may have damage, a leak or missing shingles, do not risk "life or limb" by crawling on the roof. The fastest and easiest way to examine your roof is with the use of a high-powered pair of binoculars. Check for cracked, warped or missing shingles and damaged flashings. Inside the home, look for discolored plasterboard, cracked paint, stains on the ceiling or peeling wallpaper; visual signs that the roof is compromised.

Many times, problems with the home roof system are not discovered until substantial damage has occurred. A preventive annual roof inspection by a licensed and insured roofing company is the best way to avoid having a small problem turn into an expensive project. If you find indications of a roofing problem, call a professional roofing contractor for an evaluation of the damage.

If your roof is compromised and a replacement is required, you have two options. Your roofing contractor will suggest either a complete replacement of the roof system or a re-cover of the existing roof. If you own an older home, check to see if the roof has been previously reroofed. Many city building codes only allow one reroofing before the roof must be completely replaced.

The National Roof Association advises, "The price of a new roof system varies widely, depending on such things as the materials selected, contractor doing the work, home or building, location of the home or building, local labor rates and time of year. To get a good idea of price for your roof system, get three or four proposals from reputable contractors in your area. Keep in mind that price is only one factor, and it must be balanced with the quality of the materials and workmanship."

If you are an experienced "do-it-yourself" homeowner, there are many remodeling and repair jobs around the home that you can readily accomplish without professional assistance. Repairing or replacing the roof isn't one of them. It's dangerous work requiring specialized equipment. A certified professional roofing contractor is experienced, licensed, bonded and has the equipment to do the job safely right. If you are tempted to tackle the job yourself, keep in mind that most homeowner's insurance policies will not cover damage from a compromised roof if a certified and licensed roofing contractor did not perform the work.





Posted by New Age Real Estate on 11/11/2016

Cleaning. Itís not an activity we are all particularly enthusiastic to partake in, yet is a very necessary one. After investing in a new home you want to make it maintain its value over time by keeping it in tip top shape. However, life happens and as days become weeks and weeks become months itís easy to get caught up in the flow of life and forget those once in awhile cleaning tasks that need to be done throughout the year. Never forget another cleaning task again by creating a seasonal cleaning calendar. For best results combine your everyday calendar with your cleaning one so you have everything at a glance. Spring

  • Inspect roof for any damage that could have occurred from the harsh Winter weather.
  • Look for any other Winter related damage around the parameters of your house.
  • Scrape, sand, prime and/or paint any spots around the home that need it.
  • Clear out lawn and garden beds from any debris to make way for new growth.
  • Plan out your Spring and Summer planting, gardening and landscaping projects.
  • Sort through winter clothes before storing them for the season. Donate any items your children may have outgrown and repair anything that needs mending.
  • Clean your home top to bottom by wiping down ceilings, walls and baseboards.
  • Vacuum and wipe down window panes and sills.
  • Consider holding a yard sale to get rid of any extra clutter that may have gathered over the year.
  • Deep clean the carpets in your home.
  • Clean out the inside of your fridge and vacuum the coils on the back.
  • Test all smoke detectors.
  • Have your air conditioner serviced before the hot weather hits.
  • Pressure wash your house and garage siding as well as your driveway.
Summer
  • Spray insecticides and bug repellants.
  • Inspect fire extinguishers and purchase some if you do not already own any.
  • Flip and rotate mattresses and couch cushions.
  • Regularly prune trees and shrubs.
  • Drain and/or flush your water heater.
Fall
  • Clean all patio furniture before storing it for the winter.
  • Touch up any paint that may be peeling and worn from the Summer heat.
  • Check seals on windows and doors as well as caulking. Make sure your home is well-sealed to prevent any energy leaks over the Winter months.
  • Clean out the gutters along your home.
  • If your home has chimneys have them professionally inspected and cleaned.
  • Schedule a furnace inspection before the cold weather hits.
  • Take the time to clean and organize your kitchen to prepare for holiday cooking.
  • Test and replace batteries in fire alarms.
  • Rake up leaves to prevent debris buildup.
  • Install storm windows to prepare for colder weather.
  • Clean and organize your attic and/or basement.
  • Sort through your family'sí Summer clothes before storing them for the†season. Donate any your children have outgrown and repair any that need mending.
Winter
  • Change your furnaceís filters throughout the season as needed.
  • Check the grout around your home and repair as needed
  • Program your thermostat for maximum energy savings.
  • Schedule a termite inspection.
  • Clean out the vents to your dryer.
  • Before packing holiday decorations up for the year ensure they are clean, organized and in working order.
While cleaning may or may not be your favorite activity it is one that must be done throughout the year. Creating a seasonal cleaning calendar will help to keep these tasks at the forefront of your mind and your home in prime condition. At the end of the year you will have a well-maintained home and can feel good about the hard work you put in to make your house and clean, and welcoming home!





Posted by New Age Real Estate on 8/19/2016

Purchasing a home is a large investment and not one that anyone should make on a whim. Itís important to understand your maximum budget but also what you are comfortable spending, which may not be the same number as your maximum budget. But itís also important to fully understand the hidden costs that come with owning a home. Your mortgage payment is not the only payment you will be making each month and itís certainly not the only cost associated with owning a home. Letís take a look at some hidden costs listed below: Home Insurance: Insurance is something that you may know you need, but not a cost you are thinking about when house hunting. Therefore, the cost can sneak up on you. Be sure to factor in this cost, as it will be associated with your homeís location, age and value. For example, you are going to pay more if you live in an area that is prone to natural disasters such as floods or tornadoes. Home furnishings: Is this your first home or, at least, your first home that you would like to furnish with new furniture not hand-me-downs or a couch from craigslist? There also may be items that you need for this home that you did not need in your apartment such as a dining room table or spare bedroom bed frame and mattress. Furnishing your home can be a large expense and one that you should be saving up for. You donít need to go out and spend thousands on each item and you may want to spread out your purchases, but this is a very important cost to consider when purchasing a home. Appearance: When you purchase a home there may be things about the house that you want to change or update. This is something that not many factor in when buying the home as they are so wrapped up in the process of purchasing. However, even small updates cost money and if you spend all of your money on the down payment, you will not have any leftover to make those updates to make the home truly yours. Maintenance: If you previously rented, then maintenance is not something that you had to handle, as that is what your landlord was for. However, when you buy a home all maintenance and repairs fall on you. If you are purchasing an older home itís extremely important to understand what needs to be updated or replaced now or in the near future, such as the water heater, furnace or roof. Itís possible that you may get the previous homeowner to take care of this if itís in need at the time of selling, but if these updates/replacements take place a couple years down the road then itís up to you to take care of it. There is also the general maintenance of your home such as landscaping and snow removal. Will you purchase your own equipment or hire a service? Either way, this is an additional expense. Utilities: Often times many utilities are included in your rent. Well, this is not the case when owning a home. If the home does not have a septic system then you will need to pay for water and sewerage. You will have to pay for your own cable, Internet, and phone, and letís not forget about electricity. Itís important to understand all of the utilities that you will have to pay when you purchase a home. Property Taxes: Property taxes vary by town, but will always be an additional cost when owning a home. And, this cost will increase if you make additions or significant updates to your home. More desirable/expensive locations will have higher property taxes. This is often a cost that catches many off guard so be sure to research the locations where you are house hunting to see if you can afford the property taxes on top of all of the other associated costs. This is not meant to discourage anyone but shed light on the costs that many do not consider when they are house hunting. Make sure your budget allows for your mortgage payment and the expenses listed above that are tailored to your situation and you will have no problem becoming and staying a homeowner.